How to read your power bill

  1. ACCOUNT SUMMARY

    Here’s where your electricity charges can be seen in one place. It can include the amount you owe, amounts you’ve paid, overdue amounts and rebates.

  2. NATIONAL METER IDENTIFIER (NMI)

    The electricity meter at your property has its own National Meter Identifier (NMI) number. More than one meter? Then you’ll have more than one meter number on your bill, usually all under the same NMI.

  3. RETAILER CONTACT DETAILS

    Your retailer bills you for your electricity and is your first point of contact.

  4. DISTRIBUTOR CONTACT DETAILS

    Your distributor owns the poles, wires and meter that connect you to the electricity network, and is responsible for faults or emergencies with your power supply. Your distributor charges your network charges for volume, demand and service availability.

    On the front page of your bill, your distributor’s contact details are generally on the right-hand side.

    Contact details for your distributor are shown separately on some bills or as a contact number for emergencies.

  5. TARIFF NAME

    This is the name of the tariff or plan you are on. It’s usually on the front page. If your tariff name isn’t shown, contact your retailer.

  6. RETAIL CHARGES

    This shows your total peak and off-peak kWh, and is the amount of electricity your business used over your billing period. This is your negotiated rate from your energy retailer.

  7. LOSS FACTOR

    This is used to factor in the power that is lost during transmission of your power from the generator to your business as it is set by the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO). It varies according to where you are based.

  8. ENERGY CHARGES

    These charges are calculated by multiplying the loss factor with the volume.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL SCHEMES

    LRES and SRES rates reflect the current cost of participating in the Renewable Energy Target Scheme.

  10. NETWORK CHARGES

    Network charges cover the costs involved in transporting the electricity from the electricity generators, across the electricity transmission and distribution networks, to a site. They are annually reviewed by the network and approved by the government.

  11. DEMAND

    This is the largest 30-minute peak total of real power (kW) and reactive power (kVAr) that you used during the billing period.

  12. MARKET OPERATOR CHARGES

    This section shows your market charges. These charges are paid to the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) to operate and maintain the National Electricity Market (NEM). AEMO ancillary charges are fees for activities undertaken to ensure safe and secure power delivery while maintaining the integrity and stability of power generation and energy demand.

  13. METERING CHARGES

    These are charges by your metering company for the services they provide to you. A good metering company can help you with invoice validation, network tariff verification and financial forecasting.